Kidnappings increase in Mexico

By Franco Ordonez, McClatchy Newspapers Tue Apr 22, 3:56 PM ET

JUAREZ, Mexico — Daniel Escobedo was driving to school when he stopped for what he thought was a security check at a roadblock in the Mexican city of Juarez , across the border from El Paso, Texas .

Worried about being late for class, he hurriedly handed his driver’s license to the two uniformed men, who he thought were police officers.

Moments later, two dark SUVs screeched to a halt. Armed masked men jumped out and grabbed Escobedo, 21. He spent the next six weeks blindfolded, shuttled between safe houses while a drug-gang leader negotiated a ransom with his father, who’s a lawyer. He was beaten, shocked and burned until his rescue April 1 by Mexican soldiers who’d been tipped that drug dealers were using the house.

“For a month and a half, I thought I was going to die,” Escobedo said.

He’s one of a growing number of kidnapping victims here as Mexico‘s drug gangs seek new business to replace lucrative drug smuggling, which has become more dangerous as Mexican authorities pursue the largest anti-drug-trafficking effort ever in the country.

Corporate security experts estimate that drug gangs are now responsible for 30 to 50 kidnappings a day in Mexico and that ransoms often run to $300,000 if the victim is returned alive. They often hold several victims at a time. Two other victims were being held with Escobedo.

“The narco-kidnappers are not looking for chump change,” said Felix Batista , a Miami -based corporate-security and crisis-management consultant who’s negotiated the releases of dozens of kidnapping victims throughout Mexico .

“It’s a pretty darn good side business.”

The phenomenon is spilling over into the United States . Phoenix police investigated more than 350 kidnappings last year, a 40 percent increase from the year before. Most are tied to crackdowns in Mexico , said Detective Reuben Gonzales of the Phoenix police department.

The rise in kidnapping helped prompt a recent warning from the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City about the dangers Americans might face as they travel in Mexico . “Dozens of U.S. citizens were kidnapped and/or murdered in Tijuana in 2007,” across from San Diego , according to the advisory, which was issued April 15 . “Public shootouts have occurred during daylight hours near shopping areas.”

Mexican officials say the wave of kidnappings is a sign that drug traffickers have been squeezed by President Felipe Calderon‘s yearlong offensive against smugglers. The president has dispatched 20,000 soldiers around the country to confront what had been growing drug violence that had pushed the number of kidnappings, murders and arms-smuggling cases to record levels.

“Drug trafficking is not producing for them as it did in the past,” Mexican Attorney General Eduardo Medina Mora said last month in Washington . “So they are moving into other crimes, such as extortion, kidnapping, car theft.”

However, the rise in kidnappings also shows that Mexico’s law enforcement problems go beyond narcotics. Distrust of the police, who may be involved in some of the abductions, and fear that victims will be harmed make kidnapping one of Mexico’s most underreported crimes.

Mexican officials say that only a third of kidnappings are reported to police, but corporate experts say it’s more like one in 10. A public opinion survey by the Center for Social and Public Opinion Studies , an arm of Mexico’s Chamber of Deputies, found that only 52 percent of Mexican citizens “very probably” would report being crime victims.

“People perceive the justice system is not trustworthy,” said Eduardo Rojas , the director of the center’s public opinion department. “The failure to report is related to the perception of inefficiency, corruption and injustice that exists in the penal justice system.”

That means that drug gangs can kidnap almost with impunity.

Escobedo’s father, who spoke on the condition of anonymity out of concern that the kidnappers would target him next, never reported his son’s abduction to police after the kidnappers used the young man’s cell phone to contact his father. Via a text message, they demanded $100,000 for the student’s release. One message, which Escobedo’s father showed to McClatchy , read, “if you love your son a lot, find it in cash.”

His father was collecting money from friends and relatives to pay the ransom when he received a call from the military at 5 a.m. on April 1 . The soldiers said they’d found his son, who showed his father scabs on his nose, legs, and arms that documented the torture.

“It was 40 days of suffering,” his father recalled. “It was 40 days, believe me, that I couldn’t sleep, waiting for the kidnappers to contact me again. . . . It was so many days of terror until my son was returned.”

(Ordonez reports for The Charlotte Observer .)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/mcclatchy/20080422/wl_mcclatchy/2917333

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